Skip to content

Street Fighter 6 lead developers share their biggest lessons learned from SF5's mistakes and steps forward for the new game

By Dakota ‘DarkHorse’ Hills










22 street fighter biggest lessons | Street Fighter 6 lead developers share their biggest lessons learned from SF5's mistakes and steps forward for the new game | The Paradise News


Street Fighter 5’s rough launch nearly undid all of the good will and community growth established by its predecessor, but Capcom’s fighting game division is certainly quite different from the way they were almost 7 years ago.






The lead developers of Street Fighter 6 in charge of not repeating their mistakes of the past recently discussed their biggest lessons learned from SF5 as well as where they think they’ve stepped up their game the most.









In their rapid-fire Q&A session, Game Informer asked SF6 Director Takayuki Nakayama and Producer Shuhei Matsumoto what they learned from working on SF5, and the developers took differing approaches to their answers.


Nakayama seems primarily focused on what goes into making a game feel complete beyond the general expectations of the genre, which SF5 failed at with its initial dearth of compelling content and modes.


“The feeling of actually making not just a fighting game, but something that’s fun to make and enjoyable,” answered Nakayama via Game Informer.



“The feeling of actually making not just a fighting game, but something that’s fun to make and enjoyable” – Takayuki Nakayama, on the lessons learned from SF5



Matsumoto, on the other hand, looked outside the game itself to see how they could improve their engagement with the community.


“Aspects of communication,” is all Matsumoto had to say.


This could be seen when the pair took the reigns for SF5’s final season and began to run seasonal update streams to properly showcase the new DLC characters while providing the dev team’s goals and thought process for them.


Considering their extremely positive reception from the community, these Capcom events aren’t going anywhere for SF6, and if anything, they may be more frequent.


As for what they feel their biggest step up is moving from SF5 to SF6, Matsumoto seems to admit to the current game’s faulty rollback netcode implementation since his answer is simply, “Good online connections.”


Nakayama, however, went back again to the content.


“The fact that there are a lot of modes to play with,” replied the director.


On top of the usual suspects of Versus, Arcade, Training and Ranked modes, Capcom has already shown there’s more to do in Street Fighter 6 than any other fighting game they’ve ever made.


World Tour has been expanded into an open Story Mode, goofy condition matches have been added, avatar customization is going to play a big role, and the lobby is now a place you can run around in with multiple activities to do — including the ability to play other Capcom games.



While no fighting game will ever be perfect and Street Fighter 6 will have its own issues, Capcom appears to so far be very aware of their previous shortcomings and working to not repeat mistakes.


We’ll of course have to see how the team handles the eventual problems with SF6 once released, but they’ve got at least a much better track record now after the last few seasons of SF5.


Takayama and Matsumoto have seemingly been everywhere talking about SF6 while showcasing the next entry’s highlights, and we can only hope that level of communication continues after it drops in formats similar to their seasonal update presentations for SF5.









Source: Event Hubs

Tags: