in ,

Scrapping EU rules could leave travellers stranded without compensation

Scrapping EU rules could leave travellers stranded without compensation

It’s worth repeating – again and again – that Brexit was to be a beacon of opportunity and a gateway to prosperity for British business.  

Putting aside the inconvenient truth that this is something which has not even remotely come to pass for the vast majority of UK firms, there is also the very real fear that such opportunities would come at the expense of consumers.

‘Red-tape’ is a term which has become one of the defining phrases of the entire Brexit episode. Rarely properly defined, it’s most famously been associated with noisy vacuum cleaners, curvy cucumbers and bendy bananas. 

Such claims and myths have proved an unwelcome distraction. The truth is that, for some businesses, one of the most appealing things about Brexit was the opportunity it would present for them to operate without vital regulations that uphold key environmental and consumer protections.


Featured

Review of dog microchipping regulations underway


Featured

MDU logo

MDU welcomes step forward for openness and learning in NHS

The Liberal Democrats have been clear that the December 2019 general election provided the government with a mandate to leave the EU on the terms negotiated by Boris Johnson. However, this must not be used by the government as carte blanche to tear these protections up in order to curry favour with huge corporations who regard such essential measures as irritating hurdles 

Despite our protestations, the government has nonetheless entered a shameless race to the bottom on what it deems cumbersome regulations. One of the more recent and concerning instances has been government plans to reform compensation rules for domestic flights in the UK. 

Analysis conducted by Which? estimates the new system – as proposed by the government – could save airlines tens of thousands of pounds for a single flight. At the same time, compensation for customers could plummet to a quarter of its current amount, with the average sum that each passenger would be entitled to dropping from £220 to just £57.

Put another way, if an average full flight from Gatwick to Belfast was cancelled or had a long delay, the airline is currently legally obliged to pay £39,600 in compensation. Under the proposed changes, this would drop to just £9,900.

The new system, which was put to a Reforming Aviation Consumer Policy consultation by the Department for Transport (DfT) which ended in March,…

Read Full Story At: Politico.co.uk.

Sanwo-Olu to enroll 100,000 indigent Lagosians

Sanwo-Olu to enroll 100,000 indigent Lagosians

Streamer recreates the classic Evo Moment #37 parry while blindfolded

Streamer recreates the classic Evo Moment #37 parry while blindfolded