Skip to content

Netflix's Triviaverse will test your knowledge with rapid-fire questions

By Mariella Moon

Netflix has released an interactive experience that you can fire up and play with the trivia-loving members of your family these holidays. It’s called Triviaverse, and it was designed to throw rapid-fire questions at you, which you’ll then have to answer within a time limit. You can play it alone and contend with three rounds of increasing difficulty per try, but you can also play with a friend in a turn-based bout with two rounds each. The one who’s entered the more correct answers within the time limit wins the match. 

The company says the show pulls its questions from any topic “you can imagine,” from science to history to pop culture, so it would help having a wide variety of interests. You’ll unlock badges the higher the score you get, including Bird Brain while you’re just starting out. Keep at it for fun or for bragging rights, and you may just get the ultimate Triviaverse God title.

The streaming service has been exploring subscribers’ interest in interactive content over the past few years, releasing shows and episodes you can play an active part in, such as Black Mirror: Bandersnatch. Last year, it took a big step towards achieving its gaming ambitions and rolled out games to all Android and iOS users. And just this September, it announced that it’s forming an in-house gaming studio in Helsinki, Finland to create original games that don’t have ads or in-app purchases.

Netflix already has a trivia game: It launched its first interactive daily quiz show Trivia Quest earlier this year. Triviaverse has a simpler format, however, and seems like something you could do in between tasks or play with friends in between other games. The experience is available in English, Spanish (LatAm), Portuguese (Brazil), French, German, Spanish (Spain), Italian, Korean and Japanese. It’s also accessible from all devices that can run Netflix’s interactive experiences, including smart TVs, streaming media players, consoles, browsers and mobile devices.

Source: Engadget.

Tags: