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Kid Bookie and Wheatus team up for mash-up ‘Bookie’s Dirtbag’

By Will Richards

Kid Bookie has teamed up with Wheatus for a mash-up of the iconic ‘Teenage Dirtbag’ called ‘Bookie’s Dirtbag’.

The new mash-up hears Bookie share new verses and add a modern twist to the evergreen ’90s anthem.

Of the process of creating ‘Bookie’s Dirtbag’, the rapper said: “To even have the opportunity to not only work with Wheatus but to really understand each other and the thesis behind even wanting to create an interpolated version of ‘Dirtbag’ is a ridiculous fucking anomaly when I think about the trajectory of not only where I have come from, but who I am.

“I’m a student of every artist I love that has come before me, so to work with one of the professors is always fucking awesome.”

Wheatus frontman Brendan B. Brown said: “I’ve always felt that my intentions for the song and its inception are not as important as the way people see themselves in it currently. ‘Teenage Dirtbag’ lives on because people can make it real for their own lives, now. Bookie’s version does just that.

“He’s reinventing the song with his own life, his purpose, his fears, his dreams. That’s how he’s created something new, because he found a space for himself in the narrative and that’s the only renewable resource the song represents: other people, new experiences, new lives.”

Listen to the new version below.

Speaking to NME last year, Bookie discussed his collaboration with Slipknot’s Corey Taylor on the song ‘Stuck In My Ways’ on his mixtape ‘Cheaper Than Therapy’.

“If you knew me growing up, you know that Slipknot has been one of my infinite muses to just keep going,” he said. “There was a time when I was so young, I never knew Corey Taylor’s face, but remember his voice because I used to play it on my Walkman.”

He added: “It is very cathartic to be able to wake up one day and [see that] the people that made you exist in this music industry have put you on the same pedestal as them, even if you don’t even see yourself like that.”

Source: NME