‘Floyd Mayweather created a monster’ – Canelo Alvarez personally negotiated kidnapped brother’s safe release and reigns as boxing’s pound-for-pound king but spends FOUR HOURS practising golf every day

‘Floyd Mayweather created a monster’ – Canelo Alvarez personally negotiated kidnapped brother’s safe release and reigns as boxing’s pound-for-pound king but spends FOUR HOURS practising golf every day

There’s a certain mystique that surrounds Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez, who is in pursuit of more gold when he takes on Dmitry Bivol this weekend.

The undisputed super-middleweight will move up to the light-heavyweight division for his first outing of 2022 and face the undefeated Russian for his WBA title.

Ed Mulholland/Matchroom

Canelo is one of the best paid athletes on the planet

Canelo beat Caleb Plant last time to pick up the WBO super-middleweight title but now faces an all new challenge in Bivol.

A majority decision loss to the legendary Floyd Mayweather in 2013 is the only blemish he has on his 60-fight record. He also has two draws, one against the formidable Gennady Golovkin in 2017 and the other an early career four-round stumble.

Along the way, Canelo has become a four division champion where his genius has seen him become a pay-per-view attraction.

A win over Bivol will only further his claim to go down as one of the greatest of all time. Here, talkSPORT.com recaps his stunning career and eventful life.

Alvarez’s nickname ‘Canelo’ came from his fiery red hair

Alvarez’s nickname ‘Canelo’ came from his fiery red hair

Background and early years

The youngest of eight children, Santos Saul Alvarez Barragan was a shy figure who experienced bullying before learning how to fight.

Growing up on a farm, he has six brothers who all boxed – the seven Alvarez brothers once appeared on the same card together.

Nicknamed Canelo because of his Cinnamon red hair – a relatively rare complexion in Mexico – Alvarez stood out from the other kids in Guadalajara.

One of his brothers urged him to fight back on those who’d hit and mock him. Eventually, Canelo did, bloodying a bully’s nose.

The young Canelo was tougher than he looked

The young Canelo was tougher than he looked

“I liked it too much,” Alvarez told the Guardian, years later. “I knew everything would change.”

Since the first day Canelo walked into the ramshackle Julian Magdaleno Gym at age 11, he has been trained by the father-son duo of Chepo and Eddy Reynoso.

Within three years of his amateur career, he had won the junior national championships and run out of opponents willing to fight him.

As a result, he turned professional at just 15 years old and began his ascent to glory.

Canelo the pro

After turning pro, Alvarez knocked out 11 of his 13 opponents in 19 months (though Eddy’s father, Chepo Reynoso, insists there were another 10 fights on cards so small they never made it on to Canelo’s record).

However, Canelo wanted to walk away from boxing when he was struggling to make ends meet as a young fighter.

The orthodox fighter – who signed a blockbuster $365 million deal in late 2018 – earned only a measly £15 for his first fight, against Abraham Gonzalez in 2005.

He was convinced to continue by his brother and his

Read Full Story At: Talksport.

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