Farewell to the great Galician hospital in Montevideo sold at auction to a Catholic group

Farewell to the great Galician hospital in Montevideo sold at auction to a Catholic group

El Observador said that the auction took place on the Stock Exchange this past Wednesday with a base price of $ 12,750,000. The finishing firm was Bavastro Remates, and the process was overseen by Fernando Cabrera, the Commercial Defense League’s Legal Services Manager (Lideco). Cecilia López Collazo, the president of the Crculo Católico, said after purchasing the Galician hospital that this next step is a “big task” and a “duty” that they take on as a cooperative society.

“We will begin working on the project tomorrow (Thursday). We, as an institution, are 137 years old, and we, like the Casa de Galicia, are mutual. We have plans that have been in the works for a long time, and the closure of some of Casa de Galicia’s routes has changed some of our institution’s strategies because it has changed the system, and we have received 18,000 new members, bringing our total number of partners to 18,000 “, he explained.

The Uruguayan government stepped in at the end of October to help. Galician exiles founded the Casa de Galicia communal medical organization in 1917, more than a century ago. The “huge level of indebtedness” and years of cumulative losses, according to the country’s Ministry of Public Health, were used to justify the decision. Regardless of the assistance obtained.

THE INTERVENTION WAS SUPPORTED BY FEIJO.

When asked about this decision, Alberto Nez Feijóo, the former head of the Xunta, said eight months ago that he trusted Uruguayan President Luis Lacalle Pou, who defended the chosen path (temporary intervention) as a way to avoid combining Casa de Galicia with other health centres, which eventually happened.

Feijóo then stressed the significance of this centre for the Galician community and the hundreds of mutualists who are connected to it, alluding to Lacalle’s statements in the process. The Galician president said, “Casa de Galicia needs to be Casa de Galicia.”

As a result, he emphasised that the Uruguayan government had two options: merge with other health entities or intervene temporarily to rehabilitate the institution before returning it to its “autonomous life.” “The Uruguayan government has chosen the latter, and I am grateful to keep Casa de Galicia as an independent hospital to continue its activity as a caring entity for the future,” he said. Something that was not realised in the end, since the Galician institution was sold to the highest bidder.

A CENTENNIAL INSTITUTION SAYS GOODBYE

Last March, Casa de Galicia was declared defunct. A group of partners aims to organise a new organisation to conserve an institution’s cultural legacy, which includes the famed “Santia” of Asprey, a lovely sculpture that is a symbol of Galician emigration, among other things.

Source: Medriva.

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