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Equilibrium/Sustainability — Dolphin reef playgrounds at risk from climate change

Equilibrium/Sustainability — Dolphin reef playgrounds at risk from climate change

Pacific bottlenose dolphins treat their skin conditions in coral reef spas, a new study has found. 

The dolphins are regular customers at specific Red Sea reefs, where they rub up against certain types of corals that contain distinct active medicinal compounds, according to the study, published on Thursday in iScience. 

Repeated rubbing allows these chemicals “to come into contact with the skin of the dolphins,” Gertrud Morlock, of Germany’s Justus Liebig University Giessen, said in a statement. 

This could help dolphins prevent or treat microbial infections, Morlock added.

“Many people don’t realize that these coral reefs are bedrooms for the dolphins, and playgrounds as well,” co-author Angela Ziltener of the University of Zurich added. 

“It’s almost like they are showering, cleaning themselves before they go to sleep or get up for the day.”    

They may soon be evicted: While coral reefs are critical to dolphin communities, they have becoming increasingly endangered by rising temperatures and acidity in the oceans — even in the comparative refuge of the Red Sea, according to a study Frontiers in Science.

Welcome to Equilibrium, a newsletter that tracks the growing global battle over the future of sustainability. We’re Saul Elbein and Sharon Udasin. Send us tips and feedback. A friend forward this newsletter to you? Subscribe here.

Today we’ll explore legislation that could pay to move homeowners out of the nation’s most flood-ravaged areas. Then we’ll find out why scientists are angry that the FDA won’t institute a full ban on toxic “phthalates” in food packaging. 

Government could buy flood-prone homes 

Millions of homeowners who face continual destructive floods could soon have the option of a quick, federally funded buyout under a new bill introduced Thursday by Reps. Sean Casten (D-Ill.) and Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.). 

What it says: The bill would allow the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), the federal flood insurer of last resort, to buy houses and zones deemed indefensible instead of continually paying to repair them. 

How bad is the problem? Bad, and it’s getting worse. 

The NFIP is straining under the weight of ever more frequent and severe flood events. Congress paid $16 billion to bail the program out in 2018, and Congress proposed another $20 billion in 2021. 

That problem is only growing

Flooded before mortgage paid off: Meanwhile, the nation’s coastlines are set to rise an average of 12 inches in sea level rise by midcentury — with Florida and the Gulf Coast facing even higher water…

Read Full Story At: The Hill.

Muslim Clerical Body Apologizes for False Accusations of Apostasy

Muslim Clerical Body Apologizes for False Accusations of Apostasy

Buhari regime to recruit additional 10,000 constables: Police affairs minister

Buhari regime to recruit additional 10,000 constables: Police affairs minister